Christine Stevens Mills BS, SLP, COM

IAOM Certified Orofacial Myologist, Speech and Language Pathologist

Welcome

Christine Stevens Mills COM at deskAfter forty years in private practice, eighteen years instructing at the University of Detroit Mercy Orthodontic Department and teaching an IAOM approved introductory course I have retired from treating clients. I now devote my time exclusively to teaching, training and speaking at seminars and educating professionals about my passion, orofacial myofunctional disorders.

I have formed a partnership with Keisha Nolan, owner of Nolan Speech & Language Center, so that my clients and referral sources would have a qualified therapist, who had the same drive and passion as myself.  Keisha recognized the importance of  “Total Patient Care” so she furthered her training by completing my OMD introductory course and later became an IAOM certified orofacial myologist (COM).

Keisha and I became colleagues, business partners and very close friends.  Keisha runs all business aspects of my practice, scheduling and organizing my introductory courses and seminars allowing me to semi-retire in beautiful Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  When a class or seminar is scheduled, I return to Michigan  allowing me to continue my passion of teaching and training OMD professionals.

Within this website you will find a wide selection of useful information on the field Orofacial Myology.

  • The section on Orofacial Myology provides a brief overview of the cause and effects of orofacial myofunctional disorders.
  • Please visit my blog “Orofacial Myology Today” for ongoing Orofacial Myology discussions. 
  • “Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders A to Z” is a four-day course design for the Speech Pathologists, Registered Dental Hygienists who desire the opportunity to enhance their professional skills and expertise.  It is designed for the professional who seeks the groundwork for evaluating and treating clients with OMDs.
  • Be on the lookout for my forth coming book “Two Thumbs Up - Understanding and Treatment of Thumb Sucking.”

My objective is to help the public achieve a greater awareness of orofacial myofunctional disorders (OMDs).  Feel free to contact me with your  comments and inquires.

 

I believe there are three important elements required to be an accomplished and effective Orofacial Myofunctional Therapist

DESIRE, AWARENESS, and EDUCATION

DESIRE - having the desire and drive to do my best for this client/patient that is possible.

AWARENESS - in being aware that every client/patient should be treated with respect, compassion, and understanding.

EDUCATION - not only continuing my education through classes, and reading but by teaching, attending conventions, learning from colleagues, and seeking out professionals regarding new techniques, advancement in our profession as well as advancement in associated professions.

Classes - Seminars

 

Enhance your professional

skills and expertise

 

Orofacial Myofunctional

Disorders  A  to Z

 

The course encompassed core elements of orofacial myofunctional disorders (OMDs)

 

2017 CLASS DATES

October 19-22

 

2018 CLASS DATES

June 14-17

August 23-26

October 18-21

 

Shelby Twp, Michigan

 

Learn More . . .

 

Nolan Logo
Keisha Nolan

Nolan Speech & Language Center (NSLC) is a private practice that provides the highest level of speech, language, social, and orofacial myofunctional therapy services in the Metro Detroit area.

Keisha Nolan, M.A., CCC-SLP, COM

Two Thumbs Up Book Cover

Visit our blog for additional knowledge and research within the field of Orofacial Myology

 

 

Orofacial Myofunctional  Today Blog header
14 Oct

2017

When a patient is referred, they are referred for a specific condition. As Health Care Professionals we all have specific training and expertise. However, is that all we need to be looking at?    Read >

07 Oct

2017

Parents, the next time you see your Allied Health Care Professional, surprise them by asking, “What do you know about Thumb Sucking, its complications and, what would you recommend to stop thumb sucking?” If a Habit Breaking Appliance is their answer, ask if they are familiar with an alternative treatment called Orofacial Myology? And or if they do not have an answer, ask them to look up Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Clinic website for facts and information and also read Two Thumbs Up a Guide for parents, patients, and professionals.   Read >

30 Sep

2017

Prolonged sucking patterns can contribute to structural complications however, many do not connect prolonged sucking with functional complications. Everybody part is connected and one body part will affect other parts of the body compensating by adapting, creating a snow ball effect of symptoms and problems that need to be identified. Once we embrace this concept we can enhance the connection of cause and effect.   Read >

23 Sep

2017

How many times have you looked for something but couldn’t find it? A certain bracelet, your favorite lipstick, trivial yet upsetting. So, you can imagine the frustration when you want and need to help a loved one and can’t find it. You feel like a failure. You are not alone. This mom had been searching for help for her son for over 2 years. Find out what happened.  Read >

Orofacial Myology

 A clinical discipline and area of specialization within the professions of speech-language pathology and dental hygiene dealing with orofacial functional and rest posture problems that have been linked to the dentition as a cause or effect.

Therapy involves normalizing the abnormal rest posture and tongue functioning patterns

Scope of Practice for Orofacial Myology

 Includes the evaluation & treatment of the following:

  • Abnormal non-nutritive sucking habits (thumb, finger, pacifier, etc. sucking habits)
  • Other detrimental orofacial habits
  • Abnormal orofacial rest posture problems
  • Abnormal neuromuscular muscle patterns associated with inappropriate mastication, bolus formation and deglutition
  • Abnormal functional breathing patterns
  • Abnormal swallowing patterns
  • Abnormal speech problems (only if the COM has the speech-language pathology credentials) required by his/her State, Province or Country

Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders

 

Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders are atypical, adaptive patterns that emerge in the absence of normalized patterns within the orofacial complex. An OMD disorder involves abnormal tongue functioning patterns which either prevent or disrupt normal growth and development.  When normal growth and development is disrupted due to an abnormal tongue rest posture, the dental freeway space is opened beyond the normal range, leading to changes in the dentition

 

 The regular presence of these adaptive movements can often result in a variety of disturbances

 

Symptoms of Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders

  • Open mouth rest posture of the lips
  • Low rest posture of the tongue when the mandible is hinged open.
  • Malocclusion
  • Recurring malocclusion after dental intervention
  • Weak obicularis oris
  • Difficulty with solid foods-chewing, gathering, swallowing
  • Thumb-finger-digit-tongue sucking problems
  • Speech problems (interdental or lateral /s/ lisp,  misarticulation of the /t/,/d/,/n/,/l/
  • Facial grimace during swallow
  • Ankylosed tongue
  • High narrow arched hard palate

Thumb / Finger Sucking Problems

Sucking for a new born is an instinct, a necessity for survival. Thumb sucking has been viewed during pregnancy by the prospective mother while having an ultrasound. When the thumb sucking persists past age three or becomes chronic defined as occurring in two or more settings (ex. home & school) it may be time to think about eliminating this problem.Thumb sucking

Individuals are treated for thumb/finger sucking problems for a variety of reasons.  Preventive dentists want the elimination of the thumb sucking to reestablish natural growth and development of the oro-facial structure, the orthodontist wants the pressure the thumb exerts on the teeth eliminated because the thumb exerts a force in the opposite direction the Dr. is trying to move the teeth ,as well as opening the freeway space disrupting dental equilibrium. The speech pathologist refers so the tongue can have the correct spring off point for proper articulation. And a chronic thumb sucking problem can be a contributor to a low forward rest posture of the tongue and a tongue thrust. If the thumb sucking is not eliminated the tongue thrust will remain.

There are many different treatment approaches available to eliminate a thumb problem. Psychodynamic therapy, mechanical devices, and behavior modification to name a few. The empirical data clearly supports the use of behavior strategies, specifically behavior modification. Dental appliance habit breakers tend to open the dental freeway space disrupting dental equilibrium which is not desirable.

 

Thumb sucking can contribute to the following:

  • Low forward rest posture of the tongue
  • Open mouth rest posture of the lips
  • High narrow arched palate (roof of mouth)
  • Weakness in the mid-line of the tongue
  • This weakness allows lateral margins of the tongue to flare laterally
  • Malocclusion due to disrupting dental equilibrium
  • Contributes to frontal /t/,/d/,/n/,/l/,/sh/,/j/,/z/, and frontal or interdental /s/ lisp
  • Weakness of lateral margins flaring contributes to the lateral/s/ lisp

 

 

 

boy sucking thumb

A thumb tastes best

at room temperature!

Mouth Breathing

Open Mouth Rest Posture

A thorough evaluation is required to determine whether the lips apart, open mouth rest posture is a habit due to past upper respiratory problems or if there is a medical concern that needs to be addressed. Medical conditions may include enlarged tonsils and or adenoids, allergies, seasonal sinus.

Mouth Breathing Open Mouth Rest Posture Once a determination of cause has been established a course of treatment is set forth. Treatment of lips apart, open mouth, rest posture consists of a series of exercises that will ultimately result in functional nasal breathing.  If the open mouth rest posture is not corrected it not only is detrimental to a successful orthodontic treatment plan, but it may be a contributing factor to orthodontic relapse. Furthermore, when the lips remain open, the tongue will drop down and forward resulting in an incorrect spring off point for articulation making it difficult to generalize speech sound productions into conversational speech.

Symptoms of Airway Problems

• Open mouth rest posture of the lips

• Low forward tongue rest posture

• Short upper lip with lip incompetence

• Prominent upper incisors

• V-shaped hard palate with narrow posterior maxillary dentition and high vault

• Everted, flaccid “pouting” lower lip

• Open bite

• Chapped, cracked lips

• Crease on nose (from “allergic salute”)

• Dark circles under eye

 

Low Forward Rest Posture

of the Tongue

Very light resting tongue pressures can influence tooth eruption and contribute to a malocclusion, the most common being open bite and excessive overjet. The forward rest posture of the tongue provides continuous and intermittent pressure; disrupting the dental equilibrium by opening the freeway space beyond its normal range. When the freeway space is open for hours a differential dental eruption can occur resulting in malocclusion.

Low Forward Rest Posture of the Tongue This differential eruption and the force of the tongue resting forward is the primary mover of teeth rather than the actual tongue thrust, which is commonly thought to be the contributor.  Possible causes of a low forward rest posture of the tongue include: thumb/finger sucking, tongue sucking, enlarged tonsils, high narrow arched palate, tethered frenum (tongue- tie), and low tonicity of the muscles. The two main causes are most likely, prolonged sucking habits and airway problems

Tongue Thrust

Abnormal Tongue Pattern

Abnormal tongue patterns commonly referred to as” tongue thrust” is a secondary concern if a low forward rest posture of the tongue is evident. Incorrect rest posture of the tongue contributes to an incorrect spring off point for articulation, low tone of the midline, and difficulty with transition from isolated sounds to conversational speech.

Tongue Thrust Abnormal Tongue Pattern A thorough evaluation is required to determine first, if there is a low forward rest posture of the tongue. The tongue thrust is an adaptation to (rather than the cause of) tooth movement and changes. However, a tongue thrust can develop from a forward tongue rest posture. If a forward rest posture of the tongue is present the tongue thrust can then effect dental position by contributing to making the malocclusion worse and therapy for both is needed. Rest Posture Therapy would include treatment of the open mouth rest posture of the lips, low forward rest posture of the tongue, and the tongue thrust. Therapy involves normalizing the abnormal tongue functioning pattern as a way of stabilizing the freeway space.

Thumb Sucking Complications

  • Changes to the dentition.  Most common cross bite, excessive overjet, anterior open bite.
  • Constant pressure of the thumb against the roof of the mouth can contribute to a high narrow  arched  hard palate
  • Thumb/finger sucking anchors the tongue down and forward instead of allowing the tongue to rest in the proper position on the roof of the mouth
  • Contributes to abnormal tongue patterns
  • Altered respiratory patterns, altered normal facial growth  patterns
  • Contributes to open mouth rest posture of the lips
  • Contributes to low forward rest posture of the tongue

 

 Pictures illustrating the damage that

can occur from prolonged thumb sucking:

Open Bite
Open Bite

This open-bite (top and bottom teeth not coming together) often is created from prolonged thumb sucking.The picture illustrates how the thumb can act like a wedge holding the top and bottom teeth apart. Until you remove the thumb from the equation the teeth are not allowed to grow and develop properly creating a little window. This little window allows the tongue to rest in this space which also contributes to the malocclusion.

High Narrow Arched Palate
High Narrow Arched Palate

This high narrow arched palate on the left illustrates what can happen when the thumb is consistently putting pressure on the soft tissue, thus molding the palate to the shape of the thumb. This high narrow palate makes it difficult for the tongue to rest in the correct position contributing to further changes in the occlusion, as well as forcing the swallowing pattern to change

Excessive Overjet
Excessive Overjet

This excessive overjet illustrates how the thumb sucking action places a great deal of pressure on the dentition forcing the top teeth to protrude. This position (of the teeth) makes it difficult to maintain natural lip closure

Normal Palate
Normal Palate

The model llustrates a normal shaped palate. The horseshoe shape accommodates better spacing for the teeth.

Cross Bite
Cross Bite

Strong thumb sucking action can contribute to another type of malocclusion called cross bite. In simple terms the posterior teeth do not fit properly on one or both sides. The top teeth bite inside of the lower ones instead of outside as they should. This often causes the jaw to shift to one side when the person bites together.

Seminars ~ Workshops ~ Classes

Broaden your Marketability with one of our courses!

woman at class

 

Dental hygienist - Choices of Employment

  • woman in classroomDental office - continue doing dental hygiene and incorporate OMD therapy
  • Private practice - become self-employed treating OMD’s, receiving referrals from D.D.S., Orthodontists, Speech Pathologists, Pediatricians, and other Allied Health professionals

 

Speech Pathologist - Choices of Employment

  • Private practice - incorporating speech and OMD therapy referrals from D.D.S., Orthodontists, Speech Pathologists, Pediatricians, and other Allied Health professionals
  • Hospital Setting - referrals from D.D.S., Orthodontists, Speech Pathologists, Pediatricians, and other Allied Health professionals
IAOM logo

Orofacial Myofunctional

Disorders  A  to Z

Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Logo

This introductory course will provide participants with a foundation for critical thinking in which the participant can then assimilate the knowledge to develop a clinical awareness through examination of the orofacial complex and create an individualized therapeutic program for each patient.  The course encompasses core elements of orofacial myofunctional disorders (OMDs) history, research, dental, speech, orofacial myofunctional interdisciplinary perspectives, anatomy-physiology, examination, evaluation, ethical and therapeutic approaches within International Association of Orofacial Myology (IAOM) scope of practice.

Course Objectives

  • Understand the science and research for orofacial myofunctional therapy
  • Evaluate and diagnose orofacial myofunctional disorders
  • Provide clinical and practical application of a therapeutic program
  • Discuss the multidisciplinary connection between dental, speech, and orofacial myofunctional therapy
  • Implement a plan for referral and patient education

This introductory course is offered to Speech Pathologists, Registered Dental Hygienists and Dentists. The course is a mandatory requirement for those wishing to be certified through the IAOM.  Following this course, participants will immediately be eligible for both membership and certification into the IAOM.  You will be prepared to begin evaluating and treating clients with OMDs.

 

Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders  A to Z

Session outlines, CEUs, course fee, testimonials, Instructor Bio, Contact information

  • Session 1

    Professional Scope of Practice:

    Professional credentials will determine protocol and scope of practice for the following:

    a) Speech pathologist / ASHA

    b) Dental hygienist / AGD

    c) Orofacial Myologist / IAOM

    d) IAOM ethics and certification

    Guidelines for SLP and DH

    Orofacial Myology Basics

    What are OMDs?

    Symptoms of OMDs

    Who is concerned with OMDs?

    OM vs Dental-Orthodontic Focus of therapy

    Theory

    History of MFT

    Goal for change

    Terminology

    Orthodontic Research Studies

    Orthodontic talking points

    Transducer study

    Equilibrium theory

    Tongue as a functional appliance

    Body Posture

    The Basics: Anatomy & Physiology - Airway

    Normal vs. abnormal

    Respiratory system

    Nasal vs oral respiration

    Patent nasal airway growth and development

    Mouth breathing/ medical factors

    Open mouth rest posture/causes - contributing factors

    Airway interference

    Symptoms and effects of airway interference

    The Basics: Anatomy & Physiology – Hard Tissue

    Craniofacial bone development

    Dentition and eruption patterns

    Differential eruptions

    Occlusion/malocclusion

    Dentofacial differences

    Hard palate

    Orthodontic appliances

    TMJ

    Etiologies: Structural/environmental causes

  • Session  2

    The Basics: Anatomy & Physiology – Soft Tissue

    Tongue anatomy

    Tongue growth

    Tongue adaptations

    Lips anatomy

    Pharynx, soft palate, hyoid muscles

    Tonsils- growth, development, complications, & examination

    Adenoids- growth and atrophy stages

    Ankyloglossia- assessment, referrals, surgery, & treatment

    Tongue, lip, and jaw rest postures

    Differentiation

    Feeding and Swallowing

        Oral behaviors and sensations

    Food intake

    Physiology of normal swallow stages

    Physiology of abnormal swallow stages

    Oral cavity muscles of mastication- origin and action

    Related muscle groups

    Speech

        Stages of speech sound development

        Correct lingual posture

        Malocclusions and rest posture effects on speech

    Three Approaches to OMD Treatment

    Neuromuscular facilitation

    Appliances

  • Session 3

    Differential Diagnosis and Recommended Program

    Interview and observations

    Evaluation- Review of anatomy and physiology

    Explanation of evidence

    Factors to consider before implementing a program

    Collaborative and disciplinary team approach: medical/dental/orthodontic protocol

    Developing an OMD Therapy Program

    Early prevention and intervention of oral-motor disorders

    Age appropriate therapy

    Presentation of exercises and rational for each exercise

    Hands-on experience doing exercises

    Habituation suggestions

    Review therapy forms

    Case Studies

    Asepsis and infection control protocol

    Therapy materials and resources

    Case Management

    When to provide therapy?

    Charting progress

    Problem solve ways to motivate and causes if treatment is not working

    Therapy complications

    Behavior modification- positive and negative reinforcement

  • Session 4

    Sucking Habits- Digits, Tongue, Bottle, Pacifier

    Sucking history and facts

    Recommendations by the ADA, AAP

    Statistics regarding frequency and malocclusions

    Thumb/finger and tongue sucking complications

    Professional perspective; dental, speech, myofunctional

    Evaluating the psychodynamics of chronic thumb sucking

    Thumb Therapy Techniques

    Three thumb therapy techniques

    IAOM position statement on habit appliances

    Behavior Modification thumb therapy technique

    Understanding the behavior

    Consultation assessment

    Step by step thumb therapy procedure

    Case studies and critical thinking

    Tools and motivational materials

    Business Practice & Office Management

    Clinical service delivery: forms reports, record keeping, caseload management, scheduling,

    Marketing and advertising including handouts

    Implementation & compliance issues related to patient’s privacy rights

    Third party payment billing & billing issues

    Government & regulatory issues associated with patient care

     

  • CEUs

    This course fulfills IAOM requirements necessary for the certification process.  It also provides participants with 28 AGD & IAOM CEUs and 2.8 ASHA CEUs

    .

    CEU logo
  • Attendee Testimonials

  • Course Fee

    This four day - four session course fee is $2,300.00.  Fee includes a continental breakfast, lunch, snacks, coffee, tea and water.  We cater to food restrictions. It also includes a binder of the presentations, forms and educational pamphlets.   An external flash drive containing research articles, IAOM memos, business planning ideas, screening forms, and all four days of PowerPoint presentations is also provided.

     

    Please contact us at classes@suburbanmft.com or

    (586) 726-7777 for registration information

     

    If you “Bring a Buddy” a $500 discount will be applied.

  •  IAOM Approved Instructor

    Christine Mills

    Christine Stevens Mills COMChristine Stevens Mills is an IAOM Certified Orofacial Myologist and Speech Language Pathologist. She has been in private practice for over 40 years. Christine received a speech and hearing pathology degree in 1973 at Bowling Green State University.  She began her training at the Institute for Myofunctional Therapy in Coral Gables, Florida, completing 55 hours Post Graduate training followed by 60 hours advanced Clinical Practicum and over 100 hours advanced Certification.  Christine opened her first office in 1974 in her home State of Michigan to treat children and adults with orofacial myofunctional disorders with abnormal tongue patterns and associated open mouth rest posture of the lips. Her initial training in Myo-Functional therapy also initiated her treating thumb/finger/digit/tongue sucking patterns.  In 1980 she became a (COM) Certified Orofacial Myologist through the International Association of Orofacial Myology.  Christine has served on the board of directors for the IAOM.  In 1994 she obtained the position as an Assistant Professor at the University of Detroit Mercy Orthodontic Department teaching a graduate course on Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders, officially retiring from the University in 2015. Christine currently resides in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and continues mentor, consult, lecture, and teach classes.

  • Course Contact Information

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    Please contact us at

    classes@suburbanmft.com or

    (586) 726-7777 for additional registration information

Recent Graduates

Group Seminars and Private Lectures

 

We provide exclusive custom Orofacial Myology workshops and seminar curricula for professional groups and private practices.  Our multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and treatment of Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders will enhance your organizations professional development.  Please contact us for details.

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Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Clinic

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Copyright © 2006 - 2017

Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Clinic

All rights reserved

International Association of Orofacial Myology

The IAOM certified orofacial myologist is specifically trained to diagnose and treat orofacial myofunctional disorders.

http://iaom.com

Christine Stevens Mills COM at desk

Nolan Logo
Keisha Nolan
Two Thumbs Up Book Cover

Thumb / Finger Sucking Problems

Sucking for a new born is an instinct, a necessity for survival. Thumb sucking has been viewed during pregnancy by the prospective mother while having an ultrasound. When the thumb sucking persists past age three or becomes chronic defined as occurring in two or more settings (ex. home & school) it may be time to think about eliminating this problem.Thumb sucking

Individuals are treated for thumb/finger sucking problems for a variety of reasons.  Preventive dentists want the elimination of the thumb sucking to reestablish natural growth and development of the oro-facial structure, the orthodontist wants the pressure the thumb exerts on the teeth eliminated because the thumb exerts a force in the opposite direction the Dr. is trying to move the teeth ,as well as opening the freeway space disrupting dental equilibrium. The speech pathologist refers so the tongue can have the correct spring off point for proper articulation. And a chronic thumb sucking problem can be a contributor to a low forward rest posture of the tongue and a tongue thrust. If the thumb sucking is not eliminated the tongue thrust will remain.

There are many different treatment approaches available to eliminate a thumb problem. Psychodynamic therapy, mechanical devices, and behavior modification to name a few. The empirical data clearly supports the use of behavior strategies, specifically behavior modification. Dental appliance habit breakers tend to open the dental freeway space disrupting dental equilibrium which is not desirable.

 

Thumb sucking can contribute to the following:

  • Low forward rest posture of the tongue
  • Open mouth rest posture of the lips
  • High narrow arched palate (roof of mouth)
  • Weakness in the mid-line of the tongue
  • This weakness allows lateral margins of the tongue to flare laterally
  • Malocclusion due to disrupting dental equilibrium
  • Contributes to frontal /t/,/d/,/n/,/l/,/sh/,/j/,/z/, and frontal or interdental /s/ lisp
  • Weakness of lateral margins flaring contributes to the lateral/s/ lisp

 

boy sucking thumb

Mouth Breathing Open Mouth Rest Posture

Low Forward Rest Posture of the Tongue

Tongue Thrust Abnormal Tongue Pattern

 

Dental hygienist - Choices of Employment

  • woman in classroomDental office - continue doing dental hygiene and incorporate OMD therapy
  • Private practice - become self-employed treating OMD’s, receiving referrals from D.D.S., Orthodontists, Speech Pathologists, Pediatricians, and other Allied Health professionals

 

Speech Pathologist - Choices of Employment

  • Private practice - incorporating speech and OMD therapy referrals from D.D.S., Orthodontists, Speech Pathologists, Pediatricians, and other Allied Health professionals
  • Hospital Setting - referrals from D.D.S., Orthodontists, Speech Pathologists, Pediatricians, and other Allied Health professionals
IAOM logo

  • CEU logo
  • Captcha Image

Captcha Image

Christine Stevens Mills COM at desk

Within this website you will find a wide selection of useful information on the field Orofacial Myology.

Nolan Logo
Keisha Nolan
Two Thumbs Up Book Cover

Orofacial Myofunctional  Today Blog header

An OMD disorder involves abnormal tongue functioning patterns which either prevent or disrupt normal growth and development.  When normal growth and development is disrupted due to an abnormal tongue rest posture, the dental freeway space is opened beyond the normal range, leading to changes in the dentition

Mouth Breathing Open Mouth Rest Posture

Low Forward Rest Posture of the Tongue

Tongue Thrust Abnormal Tongue Pattern

boy sucking thumb

Thumb sucking

IAOM logo
  • Captcha Image

Captcha Image

Christine Stevens Mills COM at desk

Two Thumbs Up Book Cover
Nolan Logo
Keisha Nolan

Low Forward Rest Posture of the Tongue

Tongue Thrust Abnormal Tongue Pattern

Mouth Breathing Open Mouth Rest Posture

Thumb sucking

boy sucking thumb

IAOM logo

This introductory course will provide participants with a foundation for critical thinking in which the participant can then assimilate the knowledge to develop a clinical awareness through examination of the orofacial complex and create an individualized therapeutic program for each patient.  The course encompasses core elements of orofacial myofunctional disorders (OMDs) history, research, dental, speech, orofacial myofunctional interdisciplinary perspectives, anatomy-physiology, examination, evaluation, ethical and therapeutic approaches within IAOM) scope of practice.

  • CEU logo
  • Captcha Image

Captcha Image

a

Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Clinic

Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Logo

Christine Stevens Mills COM at desk

(OMDs)

Nolan Logo
Keisha Nolan
Orofacial Myofunctional  Today Blog header

Low Forward Rest Posture of the Tongue

Tongue Thrust Abnormal Tongue Pattern

Mouth Breathing Open Mouth Rest Posture

Thumb sucking

boy sucking thumb

  • woman in classroom
IAOM logo
  • CEU logo
  • Captcha Image

Captcha Image
Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Logo

Christine Stevens Mills COM at desk

Nolan Logo
Keisha Nolan

Low Forward Rest Posture of the Tongue

Tongue Thrust Abnormal Tongue Pattern

Mouth Breathing Open Mouth Rest Posture

Thumb sucking

boy sucking thumb

woman at class
  • woman in classroom
Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Logo
IAOM logo
  • Captcha Image

Captcha Image
Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Logo
Suburban Myofunctional Therapy Logo